Funny Things About Being Deaf You Didn’t Know

Published: Nov 13th, 2020

Funny Things About Being Deaf You Didn't Know

When we talk about the deaf experience, the focus is too often on the barriers of being deaf, rather than the positives or lighthearted side.  

But having a sense of humour is the key to being proud of your deafness! And being able to see the funny side of situations is something that’ll help you feel more comfortable with being deaf. 

Here’s 7 funny things about deaf people (you might not know).   

 

1. They can tune out background noise

Unlike hearing people, some deaf people can’t hear background noise, or can tone it out. It’s a bit like having a super power! 

From traffic to loud music or barking dogs keeping you up at night, background noise can be a nuisance. But if you’re deaf, these might be problems you can avoid 

Ever heard someone living in a busy city say they ‘just want a bit of peace and quiet’. Or complain about a snoring partner? Not a deaf person! Especially a hearing aid wearer. They can remove their hearing aid and sleep just fine. 

 

2. They’re pros at people watching

Without the distraction of background noise, deaf people can enjoy things hearing people might miss out on, like being pros at people watching 

Not being able to hear what people are saying all the time, can make their behaviour much more humorous.  

Taking hand gestures and actions out of context often provides plenty of laughs. 

 

3. They’re good listeners

Communication can be difficult for deaf people, which means they have to work harder at it, and focus more  

Because of this, deaf people learn to listen in multiple ways like lipreading or body language, which can make them even better listeners than hearing people.  

 

4. They might need help with volume control

When you’re deaf it can be tough to regulate your volume, particularly in a public place.   

Sometimes, deaf people will wonder why everyone’s looking at them, then remember they might be accidentally shouting! 

If you’re communicating with a deaf person, let them know if they need to regulate their volume. 

 

5. They’ll win charades every time

It’s virtually impossible to play a game of charades without doing some basic sign language, so if you’re deaf, you’re likely to be a pro!  

No chance of a hearing team winning against a deaf team on this one 

 

6. They’re sometimes clumsy

Deaf people might need you to be an extra pair of eyes, especially in public spaces.  

To communicate better, deaf people often need to face someone straight on and concentrate intensely, but this can result in accidents like tripping up, or walking into things 

That’s where hearing people can lend their eyes, and keep a lookout for both parties. 

 

7. They’re proud of being deaf

The deaf community is a diverse group of individuals, all with their own experiences – none of which are the same. Being deaf is what brings them together, providing an opportunity to share experiences, and a joint sense of humour around being deaf.  

The deaf community is hugely supportive, and many deaf people are extremely proud of their deafness 

Want to find out more? Check out some of Deaf Unity’s current projects. 

 

3 Key Takeaways:

  1. Having a sense of humour about your deafness is key – it’s not all doom and gloom! 
  2. There are some positive to being deaf, and sometimes, deaf people are better listeners than hearing people.  
  3. The deaf community is a hugely supportive, and fun (and funny) place to be. 

 

This article was written by Heleana Neil, who works in Marketing. Passionate about all things content, Heleana can be found writing in her free time, as well as for a living. 

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